Spatchcock

Spatchcock.

There, I said it.  Spatchcock, spatchcock, spatchcock.

No, I refuse to go to my room for a time out and I won’t apologize for using that word.  It sounds obscene and it looks obscene but this is something you will definitely want to do.  You will want to do it over and over again.  Not only will you want to spatchcock by yourself, you will want to get all your friends involved, too.  Trust me.  You’ll end up thanking me for teaching you to spatchcock.

So now that I have your undivided attention, you probably want me to tell you what ‘spatchcocking’ is … don’t you?

Spatchcocking an ingenious way to prepare your turkey.  It lessens the roasting time of the turkey, cooks the entire bird more evenly and helps prevent the bottom from getting soggy from sitting in the drippings.  It also takes up less room in the oven so you can bake that huge pan of stuffing at the same time.  Your turkey skin will be crispy, the meat will be tender, juicy and flavorful and you will be the hero of the day.  What’s not to like?

The basic idea behind spatchcocking is to lay the bird out flat so nothing is tucked underneath, nothing is sticking up higher near the heating elements, and it all gets done at the same time.  Not only will the legs and breast be done at the same time, it will be done in a considerably shorter amount of time.  Think of all the possibilities!

Forgot to get the turkey in on time?  Spatchcock it.  Want to spend more time visiting and less time roasting?  Spactcock it.  Want to save energy but don’t have a solar roaster?  Spatchcock it.  Want juicy, perfectly prepared meat with a crispy skin?  Spatchcock it.  Want your bird to come to the table as a large, rounded, roast bird?  Spatchc …. uhhhhh … no.

The biggest and perhaps only downside to this cooking method is that the bird is splayed out in the pan like some fowl strumpet looking for some scratch.  I’m going to go out on a limb here and suggest that you cut the bird up prior to dinner service and arrange it nicely on a serving platter.  Trust me that your guests probably won’t mind having the bird precut.  This will alleviate the fight over the wishbone; Great Aunt Edna isn’t going to get splattered by wayward bits during the carving o’the turkey, and the whole thing isn’t going to slide off the platter and land with an obnoxious ‘plop’ on the floor next to your ridiculously crowded table.

I’ll take those hits, thank you very much.  And on a more personal note, you aren’t going to be leaving the giblets in the bird by mistake, year after year after year.  Nope.  Ain’t a gonna happen.

This is what a spatchcocked bird looks like.

Lovely, isn’t it?

This is where you can find a video on how to do this to your very own bird.

Just ignore the references to M Stewart.  It is one of the better videos I came across (even with the M Stewart references) and I just think these guys are amusing.  I’d like to see them do it with a turkey.  (I’m sure you took that the way I meant it and not the way it sounded)

This is my facebook page which you should like because I give you these awesome tips.

Check back soon (or better yet, sign up for updates) because I’m about to break out my Sangria cranberry relish recipe.  If you have never made homemade cranberry sauce/relish, you will be amazed at the ease and wonderfulness of it all.

Stay tuned, more deliciousness is on its way.

And for those who are waiting with bated breath for more ‘life lessons’ or ‘miscellaneous ramblings’ – don’t worry, I’ve another post due to hit the screen in a nonce.

Be thankful, be wonderful, be yourself.  Now go spatchcock something.  You know you want to.

Peace
TDG

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About tuesdaydangergirl

The quintessential pessimistically optimistic meat-eating vegetarian hippie chick who believes wholeheartedly in peace, love, toast and sox but not necessarily in that order. And the tiara. It's all about the tiara ;) View all posts by tuesdaydangergirl

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